Top Sights to See in the North & West of Ireland

//Top Sights to See in the North & West of Ireland

1. Down-Patrick Head

One of our favourites sights to see is Down- Patrick Head. It is a majestic heritage site found about 5km north of Ballycastle village, jutting out into the ocean and rising almost 40m above the waves. It provides unparalleled views of the Atlantic, including the unique collection of islands known as the Staggs of Broadhaven. You can also spot the nearby Dún Briste sea stack, with its different coloured layers of rock and nesting sea birds. In addition to this, Downpatrick Head is also home to the ruins of a church, holy well and stone cross. These together, mark the site of an earlier church founded by St Patrick. This view point is located in between Carne Golf Links and Enniscrone Golf Club and is a very popular sight for groups venturing this far West.

Wild Atlantic Way

2. Doagh Famine Village

Doagh Famine Village tells the story of Irish life from the Great Famine of the 1840s through until the present day. Tour guides will take you on a journey showing how families and communities lived on the edge, generation after generation.  Being forced to adapt and survive as the environment and society around the local area changed over the years. A combination of informative storytelling and life size exhibits provides an informative and thought-provoking look at Irish life. Attractions include original thatched Irish cottages (inhabited as recently as the 1980s) and an Irish Wake House among others.

3. Glenveagh National Park

Glenveagh National Park is a remote and hauntingly beautiful wilderness of rugged mountains, pristine lakes, tumbling waterfalls and enchanted native oak woodland. It is situated in the heart of the Derryveagh Mountains in the north west of County Donegal. At the centre of the Park, on the edge of Lough Veagh is Glenveagh Castle, a late 19th century castellated mansion, built as a hunting lodge. The park covers 170 square kilometres of hillside above Glenveagh Castle on the shore of Lough Veagh, 20 km from Gweedore in County Donegal. You could easily spend a day of your golf vacation exploring this magnificent park.

4. Malin Head

Located beyond Ballyliffin Golf Club, Malin Head is steeped in history and offers activities such as walking, fishing and bird watching. At low tide, you can even spot the wreckage of the ‘Twilight’, which sank in 1889 while sailing to Derry. For more history, follow the coast road. You’ll pass the old radio station, built in 1910, and The Tower, a derelict signal station located on Banba’s Crown, the most northerly point in Ireland. It’s the perfect place to relax with a picnic, as the stunning panorama includes Inistrahull and Tory islands, as well as the Scottish hills on a clear day.

Donegal Tourism

5. Croagh Patrick

Welcome to a place of ancient history, Patrick’s sacred mountain, and a rich vein of archaeological heritage. Croagh Patrick is situated five miles from the picturesque town of Westport. The mountain’s conical shape soars majestically above the surrounding countryside.

Magnificent views of Clew Bay and the surrounding south Mayo countryside are to be had from all stages of the ascent of the mountain. Follow the steps of Patrick and in doing so meet people from far and near.The perfect stop while on a golf trip to the West of Ireland

6. Carrick-A-Rede Rope Bridge

Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge is a famous rope bridge near Ballintoy in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. The bridge links the mainland to the tiny island of Carrickarede (from Irish: Carraig a’ Ráid, meaning “rock of the casting”). It spans 20 metres (66 ft) and is 30 metres (98 ft) above the rocks below. The bridge is mainly a tourist attraction and is owned and maintained by the National Trust. In 2009 it had 247,000 visitors. The bridge is open all year round (subject to weather) and people may cross it for a fee

7. Giants Causeway

One of the more peculiar sites in world, The Giant’s Causeway is an area of about 40,000 interlocking basalt columns. This is the result of an ancient volcanic eruption. It is located in County Antrim on the north coast of Northern Ireland, about three miles northeast of the town of Bushmills. The rugged symmetry of the columns never fails to intrigue and inspire its visitors. To stroll on the Giants Causeway is to voyage back in time. And just a short distance from some of the top links courses in Ireland such as Portstewart Golf Club, Royal Portrush and Castlerock.

Tourism Northern Ireland

8.Titanic Belfast

Titanic Belfast is a visitor attraction and a monument to Belfast’s maritime heritage. It is based on the site of the former Harland & Wolff shipyard in the city’s Titanic Quarter where the RMS Titanic was built. It tells the stories of the ill-fated Titanic, which hit an iceberg and sank during her maiden voyage in 1912, and her sister ships RMS Olympic and HMHS Britannic. The building contains more than 12,000 square metres (130,000 sq ft) of floor space, most of which is occupied by a series of galleries, plus private function rooms and community facilities.

9. Slieve League

Slightly forgotten about in comparison to the cliffs of moher, Slieve League is as, if not more, impressive than its southern counterparts. Slieve League or Sliabh Liag, is a mountain on the Atlantic coast of County Donegal, Ireland. At 601 metres (1,972 ft), it has some of the highest sea cliffs on the island of Ireland. Although less famous than the Cliffs of Moher in County Clare, Slieve League’s cliffs reach almost three times higher.Words fail to capture the majesty and sheer height of the cliffs. With seabirds overhead and nothing but Ocean before you, it feels like you’re at the very edge of the world. The perfect activity after playing a round at Donegal Golf Club.

10. Fanad Lighthouse

Fanad Head lies on the north coast of County Donegal between Lough Swilly and Mulroy Bay. Its claims to fame include one of the world’s most beautiful lighthouses and the famous Flight of the Earls, which took place here in 1607. you’ll take in views of the Inishowen Peninsula and Atlantic Ocean, and as the road ascends, you’ll look down upon Portsalon and Ballymastocker Bay. Don’t forget to make some time for a leisurely stroll along the adjacent headland. There you’ll see awe-inspiring waves and the Wild Atlantic Way’s most rugged stretch of coastline. This is one place where you’ll certainly want to have your camera ready.

Fanad Lighthouse

If you are looking to visit any of these attractions in Ireland, we would be more than happy to put together a golf package including a visit to many of these spectacular sights. Please do not hesitate to contact us us on Ph: +353 (0)91 868642 or Email : sales@northandwestcoastlinks.com.

By | 2018-12-13T16:58:53+01:00 December 11th, 2018|
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